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CDC Catch-Up Schedule |January 2023|

CDC Catch-Up Schedule – Due to various global events, you might have forgotten that the Food and Drug Administration of the United States recommends a huge number of vaccines, and you should be getting those according to the schedule. 

Recent global events, including COVID-19, have caused a significant decline in regular vaccines. The whole world does not revolve around the COVID vaccine or flu shots. Humans require a huge number of vaccines to live a happy and healthy life, and the number of vaccinated people has been going down in the last few months.

Unlike the COVID vaccine or flu shots, nobody can ignore other vaccines. There are a huge number of vaccines that are known to prevent several serious diseases that might cause permanent damage. 

Keeping that in mind, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of the United States came up with its CDC catch-up schedule so that Kids who start late can get themselves vaccinated according to the schedule.

During childhood, the CDC suggests a huge number of vaccines, and We are here to help you catch up with those vaccines if you or your kid have missed any of them.

Hepatitis B

The Hepatitis B vaccine is the only vaccine that is recommended at the time of birth. A healthcare provider is going to vaccinate the kid with the first dose of hepatitis b as early as birth.

  • The first dose of hepatitis b is suggested at the time of the birth.
  • Everyone should maintain at least a four-week gap between the first shot and the second shot of the hepatitis b vaccine.
  • The second dose of the hepatitis b vaccine is recommended between the first and the second month after the birth, but you can also get it till the 4th month.
  • The 3rd dose of the hepatitis b vaccine is recommended between the 6th month and to 18th month after the birth.

People who missed getting themselves vaccinated with the second or 3rd dose of the hepatitis b vaccine can get themselves vaccinated with alternative two-dose vaccines scheduled within the gap of 4 months.

Everyone above the age of 18 May also receive a combined hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccine, which is a three-dose vaccine.

Rotavirus

Vaccine for rotavirus is another popular vaccine in the United States. Rotavirus is known to cause severe diarrheal disease among infants and young children. The Food and Drug Administration has approved two different vaccines for rotavirus, and they both have different numbers of shots.

  • The CDC recommends the first shot of the rotavirus vaccine at the age of 2 months.
  • The maximum age to receive the first shot of the rotavirus vaccine is 14 weeks and six days.
  • If your kid has not been vaccinated with rotavirus, you can get the first dose by the 14th week and 6th day.
  • Everyone should maintain at least a four-week gap between every dose of the rotavirus vaccine. 
  • The maximum age to receive the final shot of the rotavirus vaccine is eight months.

Kindly do not start the rotavirus vaccine series if the kid has already crossed the age of 15 weeks. 

CDC Catch-Up Schedule
CDC Catch-Up Schedule

Inactivated Poliovirus

The United States was among the first few countries to completely control the polio virus in the country. All this happened with the successful inactivated poliovirus vaccine.

  • The Centers for Disease control and prevention recommends the first shot of inactivated poliovirus at the age of 2 months.
  • Everyone must be six weeks old to receive the first shot.
  • You must maintain at least a four-week gap between 2 shots to offer a poliovirus vaccine if the kid is below the age of 4.
  • On the other hand, kids who are above the age of 4 years can maintain a six months gap.

Everyone must be very careful when it comes to the polio virus. These types of viruses are known to cause permanent disability, and the United States also has an overall vaccine program. Parents who do not feel comfortable with injections can also go with oral solutions. 

If your kid has already missed its first shot of the polio virus vaccine, we highly recommend you consult it with your healthcare provider right away.

Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Acellular Pertussis

Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Acellular Pertussis Is other popular vaccine for childhood. This vaccine is known to prevent three major diseases, and health experts named the vaccine After those diseases. While diphtheria and pertussis can spread from person to person, tetanus enters through cuts and wounds.

  •  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advise the first dose of vaccine At the age of 2 months.
  • The second dose of the vaccine is recommended in the 4th month after the birth.
  • The 3rd dose of the vaccine is recommended at the 6th month and can be administered till the 12th month after the birth.
  • The 4th door of the vaccine is recommended between 12 to 18th months after birth.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest that dose 5 of the vaccine is not necessary if dose four is administered at the age of 4 or older.

The first four doses of the vaccine are necessary, but you can miss the 5th dose if you maintain at least a six-month gap between the 3rd and 4th doses of the vaccine.

Influenza Vaccine

The influenza vaccine is among the most popular vaccines in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest Americans get themselves vaccinated against influenza every year to prevent flu infection.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend influenza vaccine for everyone above the age of 6 months. There is no catchup schedule for influenza vaccine as Everyone is suggested to get vaccinated before the start of the winter season every year.

Even if you or your kid miss the influenza vaccine once, it might not cause any harm or lifelong conditions.

Pneumococcal Conjugate 

Pneumococcal Conjugate Is another popular vaccine known to prevent Pneumococcal disease. Pneumococcal Bacteria is known to cure several types of illnesses, including pneumonia.

This bacteria is also one of the biggest causes of pneumonia in the United States, and it is also known to cause several infections, including ear add sinus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of the United States recommend a four-dose vaccine for Pneumococcal. 

Everyone in the world can get Pneumococcal disease, but children below the age of 2 years are more vulnerable to developing severe cases of the disease. 

Keeping that in mind, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention do not recommend any more than one shot of vaccine for kids who were administered at the age of 24 months or older.

  • The CDC recommends the first shot of the vaccine at the age of 6 weeks.
  • Patients should maintain a four-week gap if the first dose of the vaccine was administered before the first birthday.

Patients should maintain at least an eight weeks gap if the first dose was administered at or after the first birthday. It should also be the final dose for healthy children.

  •  Patients should maintain a four-week gap between the second and the 3rd dose of the vaccine if required.
  • The 4th vaccine should be given after the 8th week of the 3rd vaccine. It is only recommended for kids who are at high risk of developing serious cases of infection.

The CDC recommended multiple shots in patients who are vulnerable to developing the infection. There is a probability that your kids might not even require any vaccine at all.

Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination

Measles, mumps, and rubella is another popular vaccine for kids. The Centers for Disease Control and prevention recruited two doses of vaccine for these three diseases as soon as the kid hit the 12th month.

  • Every kid should get the first dose of the vaccine between the age of 12 to 15 months.
  • The second dose of the vaccine should be administered between the age of 4 to 6 years. 
  • Kids who failed to get the vaccine during the first 15 months can also receive it till the end of the 3rd year.
  • Similarly, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest the second dose of the vaccine till the 18th birthday.

The maximum age to receive the first shot of the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine is 12 years. If your kid has already crossed the age of 12, then we highly recommend you consult vaccination with your healthcare provider. 

Your healthcare provider might be capable of helping your kid get vaccinated with two doses of the vaccine. Maintaining a gap of 4 weeks.

What is the CDC catch-up schedule?

The CDC catchup schedule can help you and your kids get vaccinated with some important vaccines Even after crossing the recommended timeline. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released an updated schedule for different vaccines at the start of every year, and parents should get their children vaccinated with the important vaccines according to that schedule.

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